Autism Oregon - Education /stories/education Stories on general education. en OPB on Autism and College /stories/opb-autism-and-college <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even"><p>An interesting 8 minute audio story on autism and advocacy, supports, and college.</p> <p><a href="http://www.thetakeaway.org/story/finding-services-adults-autism/">http://www.thetakeaway.org/story/finding-services-adults-autism/</a></p> <p>In the audio program above the ASPIRE program is mentioned. Through Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, ASPIRE offers classes, internships, mentoring, and other services:</p> <p><a href="http://www.massgeneral.org/children/aspire/services/summer-adult-boot-camp.aspx">http://www.massgeneral.org/children/aspire/services/summer-adult-boot-ca...</a> ($950)</p> <p><a href="http://www.massgeneral.org/children/aspire/services/adult-programs.aspx">http://www.massgeneral.org/children/aspire/services/adult-programs.aspx</a></p> <p>Some colleges sign up for their program (and pay for it!) so folks with autism do very well in the college because of these supports customized to autism.</p> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 19:45:30 +0000 admin 3469 at /stories/opb-autism-and-college#comments Beginning Reading and Math Software Giveaway Through Dec 15th /stories/beginning-reading-and-math-software-giveaway-through-dec-15th <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even"><p>Funnix Beginning Reading and Funnix 2 is 220 complete lessons taking children from beginning non-readers to reading at a beginning third grade level.The Funnix reading program can be used with kids 4 or 5 years old through second graders who are having trouble. It can be used by teachers with small groups of kids, or by a parent or tutor. The program is designed so that someone who can read is with the child as the child goes through the program. </p> <p>Funnix Beginning Math is a 100-lesson computer program, designed for preschool or kindergarten children who know no math and have no counting skills. It is also appropriate for older students who have not learned beginning math operations.</p> <p>Visit <a href="http://Funnix.com">http://Funnix.com</a> soon to get your copy before the free download period ends on December 15th!</p> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Mon, 03 Dec 2012 18:13:21 +0000 admin 3421 at /stories/beginning-reading-and-math-software-giveaway-through-dec-15th#comments Oregon RISE (OR PTI) Doors Closed Due to Financial Irregularities /stories/oregon-rise-or-pti-doors-closed-due-financial-irregularities <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even"><p>Oregon RISE (Respect, Inspire, Support &amp; Educate), previously Oregon PTI (Parent Training &amp; Information Center) and COPE has shuttered its doors as the Executive Director and all board members quit due to "reports of unpaid bills and questionable finances."</p> <p>The $128,000 per year Executive Director, Janice Roberts, resigned after finding that she was having financial difficulties and loaning herself money. This is a big no-no in the world of nonprofits. The board followed suite by all quitting. </p> <p>Of interest is the funding of the organization - $264,000 per year from Oregon Department of Education and $700,000 per year from the Federal Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). With a combined income of just under $1,000,000 a year it was understood that several years ago this non profit paid the people that did the actual work throughout the state low wages without any benefits.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2012/07/oregon_disabilities_program_hi.html">http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2012/07/oregon_disabilities...</a></p> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Sat, 07 Jul 2012 15:46:03 +0000 admin 3402 at /stories/oregon-rise-or-pti-doors-closed-due-financial-irregularities#comments Oregon families say state falls behind on special needs students /stories/oregon-families-say-state-falls-behind-special-needs-students <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D8QH6P7O1.html Oregon families say state falls behind on special needs students 07/21/2007 By JULIA SILVERMAN / Associated Press Nearly every area associated with education got a significant budget boost from the Oregon Legislature this year, from pre-kindergarten programs to the state's seven universities. Except, that is, for a fairly obscure regional program that serves an estimated 8,000 or so families across Oregon whose children are autistic, or struggle with orthopedic problems, or were born deaf, blind or both. The ranks of such families are small, but growing fast, by 20 percent in the last two years alone. And their voices, they thought, were loud — but apparently not loud enough. Now, the program in question, which is collectively run by eight regional education cooperatives to provide local teachers the training and support on how to work with special-needs kids, is facing a funding plateau. Lawmakers put $31.8 million into the program, a $1 million increase, but still about $4 million short of the funding request from State Schools Superintendent Susan Castillo. That's enough to cover a cost-of-living boost for current staff over the next two years, but not enough to hire any new help to cope with the increasing student population. James Sager, an education policy adviser to Gov. Ted Kulongoski, said that in the end, the program simply slipped through the cracks. And toward the end of the session, lawmakers were reluctant to carve any money out of a $260 million fund slated to go directly to school districts for targeted improvements, like reducing class sizes. "We need to do a better job next cycle of showing where the increased costs have occurred and why there needs to be additional funding in that particular area," Sager said. The upshot of the essentially flat funding is that each employee will have more children to focus on, perhaps adding 10 or 12 more students and their families to already full plates, said Sue Mathisen, who directs the Lane Regional Program in Eugene. "The long and short of it is that caseloads will be much higher, we will continue to offer the same services, but staffing will be much more stretched," Mathisen said. "But we have experienced such large growth over the years, it has become normal — people almost expect it. It's kind of like here we go again." One reason the regional programs may have slipped under the radar is that most of their employees don't work directly and regularly with students and their families. Instead, the programs are intended to free individual school districts from paying for expensive specialists who work with such special needs children. Such specialists are hard to find and train, and there may be only a handful of children per school district who need their services. Regional program employees can help train local teachers in areas like Braille, language development, sign language, and how to help autistic children develop communication and social skills. Letters in support of the program poured in from families around the state as lawmakers were deciding on the pieces of the education budget, to no avail. Teri Durham, a Portland lawyer, wrote to say that regional programs staff have helped her second-grade son, Jaylen, cope with basic tasks like reading and writing, despite his profound hearing loss. "I am concerned that if funding for the program is put on the backburner, the future for my son and the other children served by the program will also be set aside," she wrote. "Their futures will suffer if their current services need to be reduced in order to meet the program's increasing demand." Krista Stromme, a mother of two autistic boys from Grants Pass, testified that she didn't know how to cope with increasingly aggressive behavior from her 15-year-old son, Bradley. A staff member from Southern Oregon Regional Programs stepped in, she wrote, and was able to work with Bradley's teacher to get her son some help. "Bradley's behavior has changed dramatically since the new interventions," Stromme told lawmakers. "I have high hopes for Bradley, and while it may seem like a small thing to most people, what she did made a huge impact on this family's daily life." Autism, in particular, has been on the political radar screen, after plenty of publicity about the sharp rise in the brain disorder among Oregon children. Doctors have said the rise partly stems from an expanded understanding of the disease's symptoms, while other researchers have tried to pinpoint environmental factors. Nancy Latini, who heads the Office of Student Learning and Partnerships at the Oregon Department of Education, said she has her worries about the program's future, even as lawmakers promise to take a closer look at it during upcoming sessions. "I worry about how are we supporting the districts and the kids who need these services, as money dwindles," she said. "Does that mean that the services have become so limited that it is less meaningful?" </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Sun, 22 Jul 2007 19:19:28 +0000 Stacy 308 at /stories/oregon-families-say-state-falls-behind-special-needs-students#comments Couple challenges appeals court ruling in 5J schools suit /stories/couple-challenges-appeals-court-ruling-5j-schools-suit <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">Couple challenges appeals court ruling in 5J schools suit Published: May 4, 2007 By CHRIS COLLINS ccollins@bakercityherald.com A recent ruling by the 9th U.S. District Court of Appeals in a lawsuit which a Baker City couple filed against the Baker School District almost six years ago proves that the district provides quality service to special education students, the district's attorney, Dan Van Thiel, contends. But Pamela Van Duyn, who with her husband, James, filed the suit on behalf of their son, Christopher, who is autistic, believes the ruling is flawed. She has asked the court to reconsider its decision. Van Thiel told the Baker School Board during a special meeting Tuesday night that the district should be very proud of the outcome of the lawsuit. The Van Duyns allege in the suit that the district failed to provide their son with a free appropriate public education, as federal law requires, because the district did not properly implement the boy's individualized educational program (IEP) while he was a student at Baker Middle School. On April 3, 2007, a panel of three judges from the Court of Appeals upheld, by a 2-1 decision, the rulings of two lower court judges who found that the school district properly applied all but one part of Christopher Van Duyn's education program. Both administrative law judge Weisha Mize (in April 2002), and U.S. District Judge Michael Mosman (in January 2005) concluded that though the district failed to comply with the math requirement of Christopher Van Duyn's IEP, the district otherwise complied with and properly implemented the plan. "This decision is a good one for this district," Van Thiel told the board. "You can be proud." Director Deon Strommer said the decision renewed his confidence in district programs. "It shows that the staff is doing what it's supposed to be doing," he said. Van Thiel noted that the two federal appeals court judges sided with the Van Duyns on just one of 11 issues. "It is indeed one of the best decisions I've seen and I've seen a number of them over 40 years," Van Thiel said after Tuesday's board meeting. "When you toss out 10 out of 11, I think that's an excellent result." Van Thiel said the ruling established new law for defining "material violations" of individualized educational programs, which must be developed for all students receiving special education services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). "It refines that law, with a focus on materiality and what does it mean to depart from an IEP," he said. And that's the crux of the problem, according to Pamela Van Duyn, and why four educational advocacy groups have joined her family in asking the court to reconsider the ruling. "There were factual errors made in the decision," Van Duyn said. "That could affect enforcement of IEPs for every child in the western United States." And that's why she hopes the appeals court will take a second look at the ruling, she said. "I am an advocate not only for my own disabled child, but for others," Van Duyn said. "A long time ago this became about a lot more than Christopher." Christopher is now 18 and attending school in another district, his mother said. The issue that led the Van Duyns to file the lawsuit started in 2001 when Christopher was 13 and making the transition from South Baker Elementary School to the Baker Middle School. Pamela Van Duyn said the middle school staff was not prepared to handle Christopher's "intense needs." She worked with a team of teachers and other district employees to prepare an individualized educational plan for him to use as a seventh-grader during the 2001-02 school year. In making its ruling, the appeals court evaluated Christopher's class schedule, which it said included "language arts-reading and written work" for six to seven hours per week, "math computation/math computer drills" for eight to 10 hours per week and "adaptive P.E.-gymnastics and swimming" for three to four hours per week. Among other requirements, his educational program included a behavior management plan that was to be implemented full time and called for him to be presented material at his level in a self-contained special education classroom. It also called for his teachers and teaching assistant to receive specialized training about autism. The court's majority opinion states that although the district did not meet every requirement of Christopher's education program "none of the implementation failures was material" (with the exception of the math requirement). In defining "the materiality standard," Judge Raymond C. Fisher, who was joined in the majority opinion by Judge Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain, wrote: "A material failure occurs when the services a school provides to a disabled child fall significantly short of the services required by the child's IEP. Minor discrepancies between the services provided and the services called for by the IEP do not give rise to an IDEA violation." Fisher and O'Scannlain concluded that only a five-hour shortfall of math instruction "was a material implementation failure" that was corrected upon the administrative law judge's order. In his dissenting opinion, Judge Warren J. Ferguson argued: "Given the extensive process and expertise involved in crafting an IEP, the failure to implement any portion of the program to which the school has assented is necessarily material." Ferguson concluded: "I would reverse the district court and hold that the school district's failure to fully implement the IEP, to which it expressly assented, violates the IDEA." The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the lower court's ruling regarding the Van Duyns' attorney's fees, which were denied by the District Court judge. Fisher wrote that because the Van Duyns partially prevailed, they are "entitled to reasonable attorney's fees for the relevant work done at the administrative hearing level — though not for (Pamela Van Duyn), who has acted as one of (Christopher's) attorneys in these proceedings." Van Thiel told the school board that because the Van Duyns prevailed on only one of the 11 issues considered, attorney fees probably would be awarded on a one-eleventh basis. Pamela Van Duyn disagrees with that assessment. "That's not the way the 9th Circuit viewed it," she said. "They recognized we were successful on a substantial claim." That issue will be returned to the U.S. District Court to determine fees owed to Damien Yervasi, a Baker City attorney who served as attorney of record for the Van Duyns at the administrative hearing and at the U.S. District Court level. Yervasi, who is seeking election to the Baker School Board in the May 15 election, said he has taken a secondary role in the case in recent months. Pamela Van Duyn argued the case in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Yervasi said he would not be concerned about a conflict of interest if he were elected to the board. "Obviously, I would not be able to participate in any executive session proceeding on the school board that required a decision to be made during any pending litigation," he said. "With all the challenges facing the school board, I think that's one of the lesser things." The case is being carried forward for the Van Duyns by the Legal Aid Society of San Francisco-Employment Law Center. On April 24, Shawna L. Parks of the center filed an amicus curiae (friends of the court) letter brief on behalf of fellow "friends," the Learning Rights Law Center, the Oregon Advocacy Center and Protection & Advocacy Inc. The letter supports the Van Duyns' request that the three-member panel or all nine judges of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rehear the case. "By making it easier for school districts to forego implementation of services agreed upon through this process, the panel decision frustrates the rights of these families to the equal opportunities for education mandated by Congress in IDEA and strengthened in its subsequent reauthorizations," Parks wrote. Pamela Van Duyn said if the request for a rehearing is granted, the advocacy groups will continue to write briefs and argue the case at no cost to the family. If they prevail, the school district would be required to pay their fees also, she said. http://www.bakercityherald.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=4938</div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Sat, 05 May 2007 06:31:47 +0000 Stacy 292 at /stories/couple-challenges-appeals-court-ruling-5j-schools-suit#comments District officials say legal bills exceed $175,000 /stories/district-officials-say-legal-bills-exceed-175000 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">District officials say legal bills exceed $175,000 Published: May 4, 2007 By CHRIS COLLINS ccollins@bakercityherald.com The Baker School District has racked up legal fees of more than $175,000 in a six-year dispute over special education services the district provided to a child with autism. Dan Van Thiel, a Baker City attorney who gives legal advice to the district, told board members in a special meeting Tuesday night that the district should seek additional insurance coverage to help pay these costs. "That's a budget breaker," Van Thiel said of the litigation expense. "I want to look at if you can get more coverage for the defense of these kinds of cases." James Van Duyn of Baker City filed a lawsuit on behalf of his son, Christopher Van Duyn. The school district was represented by Richard Cohn-Lee of The Hungerford Law Firm of Oregon City. Neither Van Thiel nor the district could say whether the $175,000 expense included the $25,000 the district's insurance carrier has paid. Cohn-Lee did not return phone calls to his office in time for this story. Baker Superintendent Don Ulrey added that in addition to the legal expenses, three special education directors as well as teachers, classroom assistants and principals were called from their duties because of the complaint. "Not only do we having this outstanding cost, but the cost for individuals to testify, travel and give depositions," Ulrey said. "I have appreciated their work." Ulrey said figuring that cost into the total brings the expense to "way over" $175,000. Christopher's mother, Pamela Van Duyn, who also served as an attorney in arguing the case against the school district, agrees that the money the district spent in defending the case could have been put to better use. "I believe the responsibility for the public expense of all this is on the district's decision makers to litigate rather than simply provide the services they agreed to provide in Chris's IEP (individualized educational plan)," she said. "They could have easily avoided all this by simply complying with Chris's IEP. It is clear they didn't. It is also clear that we never asked for more than that." The district is also facing a negligence complaint filed in Baker County Circuit Court on March 6 by Harold Poeling, a former Eastern Oregon University student teacher who spent time during 2005-06 at the Baker Middle School and Baker High School. Poeling claims he suffered permanent injury to one of his hands on Dec. 6, 2005, when a window he opened in the music room of the middle school Central Building "spontaneously slammed down crushing Poeling's ring and middle fingers, breaking bones in both fingers and causing extreme lacerations." He seeks economic damages of $100,000, claiming that his "ability to excel in his profession as a music teacher and trumpet player has been severely limited" by the injury. He seeks non-economic damages of not less than $100,000 for the "pain and suffering" he has experienced since the injury. Poeling also seeks $6,630.38 to pay his medical expenses. Van Thiel said the issue of whether the district or the university is responsible for the Poeling's claim has yet to be decided. "I think it's a good workers comp claim," Van Thiel said. The district will be represented in the complaint by Peter Mersereau, a Portland attorney. Brent Smith, a La Grande attorney, is representing Poeling. The district also has come to an agreement with the North Powder School District regarding a civil rights complaint brought by David and Carrie Richman of Haines regarding special education services for their preschool daughter with Williams Syndrome. The syndrome is "a rare genetic condition (estimated to occur in 1/20,000 births) which causes medical and developmental problems, according to the Williams Syndrome Association. More information is available at this Web site:www.williams-syndrome.org. The Richmans' daughter will attend kindergarten at North Powder next year as her parents have requested, said Barry Nemec, the Baker District's special education director. Both districts agree with the Richmans' assertion that it would be in their daughter's best interest to remain in the North Powder School District where her two siblings attend, Nemec said. "It would make sense for Baker to pull her back to our district and give her the benefit of our staff's expertise," Nemec said. But because of her special needs, her parents have advocated for keeping her at North Powder. It also becomes of question of which district would receive the special education funding (about $12,000 per child per year), Nemec said. A federal mediator from Seattle helped forge an agreement between the districts. "Sometimes you have to step away from the financial side and look at what's best for the student," Nemec said. "And sometimes it takes that extra person in the room who doesn't have an opinion to get to a decision." The state Department of Education has proposed changing the way it handles inter-district transfers for students with disabilities in 2007-08, Nemec said. The change would allow North Powder to receive basic and weighted state school support funding for the child and to take responsibility for providing her with a free and appropriate public education as required by federal law. http://www.bakercityherald.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=4940</div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Sat, 05 May 2007 06:17:52 +0000 Stacy 290 at /stories/district-officials-say-legal-bills-exceed-175000#comments Autism Expertise /stories/autism-expertise <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">Autism expertise The lack of a specialized state program for licensing teachers to instruct autistic children worries some local parents and educators By Paris Achen Mail Tribune Autism — the fastest-growing disability among the state's schoolchildren — demands specialized instruction with intervention specifically tailored for the disorder's complex variety of manifestations, experts say. Yet, Oregon, like most other states, neither requires nor offers an autism credential to special education teachers and autism specialists. More: http://www.mailtribune.com/archive/2007/0326/local/stories/mon_autismendorsement.htm</div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Fri, 30 Mar 2007 16:39:53 +0000 Stacy 235 at /stories/autism-expertise#comments Scholarship for Oregon Teacher /stories/scholarship-oregon-teacher <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">Parents of Autistic Children of Oregon's mission is to educate the community on effective autism treatment. One way of doing this is to create a pool of qualified individuals to conduct trainings, consultation and assessments. We feel there is a tremendous need in the Oregon and SW Washington area and we are looking for an educational professional (preferably a public school special educator) who wants to further his or her contribution to the field of special education. POAC of Oregon takes great pride in offering one scholarship (over $500 value) for tuition for the Association of Direct Instruction Conference in Eugene, Oregon from July 22nd through July 26th, 2007. For more information on the conference, please see: http://poac-or.org/files/Eug_Bro_07_web.pdf. Graduate credits are available through the University of Oregon. There is an application packet that must be completed before you can be considered. Application is here: http://poac-or.org/?q=node/39 The agreement to be signed is located here: http://poac-or.org/?q=node/38 Applications are due (postmarked) by May 15th, 2007. POAC of Oregon will notify the selected scholarship recipient by June 1st, 2007 via email. In return, the scholarship recipient will provide two 2-hour workshops over a 12 month period. Workshops will take place in or near scholarship recipient’s school district. Workshop materials and presentation will be approved by the POAC of Oregon Board of Directors. All costs associated with putting on the workshop (handouts, equipment, room) will be paid and arranged by POAC of Oregon. Please feel free to email any questions by clicking on "Contact us" at http://poac-or.org. </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Tue, 20 Mar 2007 19:00:31 +0000 admin 119 at /stories/scholarship-oregon-teacher#comments Oregon IDEA Part B Application: public notice and comment periods /stories/oregon-idea-part-b-application-public-notice-and-comment-periods <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-item even">Each year, the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) is required to complete and submit United States Department of Education (USDOE) applications to be eligible for funds under Parts B (3-21) and Part C (birth-2) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004). The Part C application is due to USDOE by April 20, 2007; the Part B application is due by May 4, 2007. ODE is required to complete and publicly post both applications for 60 days for public review. Thirty days within the 60 day posting period must be designated for receiving public comment related to the applications. ODE will review all public comments and implement changes, if needed. ODE completed and posted both the Part B and Part C applications for public review on the ODE website (http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=260 ) on February 20, 2007. The 60 day public notice period started on February 20, 2007 and continues through April 20, 2007. The 30 day period for receiving public comment began February 20 and ends March 21, 2007. Please note that initially the financial portions of the applications were posted with the same dollar amounts as the previous year. USDOE instructed states to do this until such time as an official 2007-2008 IDEA allocation was known. Last week ODE received the 2007-2008 IDEA Part B and C allocation information, and we have updated the posted Part B and Part C applications to reflect this new information. Please direct electronic public comments on the Part B application to Eric Richards at eric.richards@state.or.us. Comments on the Part C application may be submitted to Jennifer Olson at jennifer.olson@state.or.us. You may also fax your comments to Eric or Jennifer at (503) 378-5156 or mail comments to: Oregon Department of Education Office of Student Learning and Partnerships Public Services Building 255 Capitol St. NE Salem, OR 97310 If you have any difficulty opening the attached document, please contact Jan Burgoyne at jan.burgoyne@state.or.us or 503-947-5784. Nancy Latini, PhD Assistant Superintendent Student Learning & Partnerships </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-3 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above clearfix"> <h3 class="field-label">Stories:&nbsp;</h3> <ul class="field-items"> <li class="field-item even"> <a href="/stories/education">Education</a> </li> </ul> </div> Tue, 20 Mar 2007 18:40:08 +0000 admin 115 at /stories/oregon-idea-part-b-application-public-notice-and-comment-periods#comments